blog | about | contact | origins | help
 
  
Share |

I am an employee at a Jewish institution who was abruptly elevated to fill the role of my superior a few years ago when my superior unexpectedly retired. I was under contract with multiple years still to go on that contract. As the employing organization was in turmoil over the sudden retirement, there was a great deal of confusion, distress, a precipitous loss of supporters, and there was a financial crisis due both to the economic downturn and the loss of support. On taking the role of my superior, I turned my attention to reassuring the staff, retaining and recovering supporters, and providing continuity of leadership, in order to stabilize and to rebuild the organization. All those efforts have proven successful. Now that the employer has seen support re-established, and has largely restored and even begun to improve its overall financial position, I have asked them to renegotiate my contract to reflect my current position and role, the role I have actually fulfilled during the past several years, rather than continuing to hold me in the lessor role that I previously filled. The organizational leadership did not choose to bring up the issue, or consider making this change on their own. I have now raised it. Assuming that the renegotiation proceeds as expected, I will be confirmed in the superior role, and will be awarded a compensation commensurate with that role. My question is whether it is appropriate for me to ask the organization to compensate me for the difference in the amount I was paid in the junior role while serving in the role of the superior? In other words, am I owed 'back pay' for stepping up and fulfilling the more challenging role? I believe that there is an argument to be made that the organization may have transgressed several Jewish values and principles in this matter, including Kavod HaBriyot, Yosher, and perhaps even Geneiva. I am asking specifically in regard to Jewish values, not secular law issues here. What is your take on this?




LATEST BLOGS  view all blog entries

The Paradox of Religious Indifference

Posted on 12/12/2018 by Rivkah Lambert Adler in Beliefs and Practices
I am often bewildered by two opposite trends. On the one hand, I hear from people all the time who are on the periphery of...

Women, Wine and Feminine Wiles: A Chanukah Tale

Posted on 12/04/2018 by Rivkah Lambert Adler in Holidays
Every Hebrew School child knows about Yehudah (Judah) HaMaccabee, the Kohen (Jewish priest) who led the Maccabean Revolt...

“Jews” for Jesus? No Way!

Posted on 12/02/2018 by Moshe Daniel Levine in Beliefs and Practices
The term “pluralistic institution” can often seem quite oxymoronic. Pluralism is generally defined as a state...

Feeling Deep Compassion for the Oppressed

Posted on 12/02/2018 by Rabbi Yaakov Bieler in Beliefs and Practices
A particularly moving paragraph that is recited by the entire congregation of pray-ers as part of the Shacharit (morning)...

Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism, Both, or Neither

Posted on 12/02/2018 by Jacob Schwartz in Beliefs and Practices
B”SDAnti-Zionism is not inherently anti-Semitic. If you don’t agree with that sentiment, you may want to open...

Haters and Lies about Judaism & Jews

Posted on 11/29/2018 by Moshe Daniel Levine in News & Updates
Many absurd and dangerous conspiracy theories have intellectual or otherwise benign origins. In the late 1990s a team of...
JVO Panel  of Scholars
           
 
NOW ADD JVO CONTENT TO
YOUR WEBSITE A FREE SERVICE
 
Click here for instructions to embed the
JVO "JEW Q's" widget on your website.
 
Jewish Values Online

Home | Search For Answers | Ask A Question | About | Contact Us | OriginsUseful Links | Blog | Help | Site Map

Copyright 2014 all rights reserved. Jewish Values Online
 
N O T I C E
THE VIEWS EXPRESSED IN ANSWERS PROVIDED HEREIN ARE THOSE OF THE INDIVIDUAL JVO PANEL MEMBERS, AND DO NOT
NECESSARILY REFLECT OR REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE ORTHODOX, CONSERVATIVE OR REFORM MOVEMENTS, RESPECTIVELY.